What Does It Mean To Be “Stuck In Your Head

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If there were another way to explain what the sensation of being all cramped up in one’s own thoughts felt like, it would probably be used more often than being “stuck in your head.” For those who know the feeling, there are few words that could articulate it better. In recovery, we learn something important to help us get through the times of negative thinking: our brains are not our friends. Our brains are our greatest tools, allies, and supporters. They also can be our worst enemies. 

Early Recovery

The first few months of recovery involves a lot of healing for the brain. As the toxic chemicals from drugs and alcohol leave the brain, it is left to reckon with the disastrous aftermath. Part of that cleanup process includes a reintroduction of emotions combined with a simultaneous residue of cravings. Resulting is a hyperactive brain full of very conflicting thoughts. Once those thoughts get running, it can be hard to make them stop. Into the future, into the past, hyper analyzing and criticizing, worrying and stressing, craving and fighting against cravings…the thoughts become a pressure as in a kettle that’s ready to whistle, only there is little relief. Like being stuck in the middle of a bee swarm that is one’s own mind, without becoming perfectly still and waiting for the swarm to stop, one is likely to get stung. The venom? Being distracted from the present moment. Despite the modern ability to multitask efficiently, the brain actually doesn’t like to be focused on an unnecessary amount of things at once.

How To Get Out Of Your Head

 

  • Talk To Someone. Having a one-man conversation will eventually lead to madness. When we are “stuck in your head” madness doesn’t feel like a long trip. Usually mixed into this thinking is shame and guilt, preventing us from feeling like we can talk about these thoughts to anyone. However, something amazing happens once we start saying some of these thoughts out loud- they stop. They lose their power because we are able to see them from someone else’s perspective.
  • Get Into Action. Running thoughts can feel debilitating, as though the only thing we can do is sit and think. Changing up the brain patterns helps to break up the thinking. We can exercise, be of service to others, or clean up around the house.

 

 

Relief is waiting for you in recovery. We promise you: it does get better. Aurora Recovery Centres has a solution to the problem of drug and alcohol addiction. Our programs are offered to men and women looking to change their lives. For more information, call 844-515-STOP.  

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